Schüttungen (Pours), 1998, 2002–4, 2007

Schüttungen (Pours), 1998, 2002–4, 2007

I made my first pouring experiments in 1998. For the pours, I placed a collection of five to twenty everyday objects—including a metal bracket, a pencil, and a screwdriver for example—in a bag and poured its contents onto a tabletop. I photographed the resulting configurations of objects before rearranging them according to my own intuitive sense of order. I was interested in the contrast between the two arrangements, the random one and the “corrected” one, that is, in trying to make my intuitive actions more objective. I continued these experiments with pouring in two different versions, at first. There were experiments in which there were two of each object, divided up between two bags, so that after the pours I could form pairs. I then placed them on the table side by side in mirror symmetry. Later, from 2002 to 2004, I extended the work by inviting artist friends to do pours with me. Together we developed rules for dealing with and placing the objects. In 2007 I took up the pouring experiments again but now related them to ideas and questions of urban planning. An urban planning ensemble can be understood as a random conglomerate or as a planned structure. My goal was to relate these two ideas and make the tension between them visible.

Materials: 15–20 everyday objects

Schüttungen (Pours)

Schüttungen (Pours)

Schüttungen (Pours)